Royal Canadian Navy

Ships of the Royal Canadian Navy since 1946

Submarines

Year 1961 1965 1967 1968 1969 1971 1972 1973 1974 1979 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Number 1 2 3 5 4 5 7 8 8 9 8 7 7 6 5 5 5 6 7 8 10 9 9 9 10 9 10 10 9

SS, ex-US Gato-class

First submarine commissioned into the RCN (not counting the captured U-boats). Ex-USN USS Burrfish.

SS, ex-UK Oberon-class

Three RN Oberon-class submarines which formed the RCN's first active submarine force.

SS, ex-US Tench-class

US Navy submarine USS Argonaut was leased from the USN and commissioned into the RCN in 1968, replacing HMCS Grilse in the training role from 1969. After the commissioning of the fifth and last of the Prince Rupert-class SSKs in 1974, Rainbow was decommissioned and returned to the US, as the training and proficiency-maintenance role was taken over by the three Oberon-class boats..

SSK, Prince Rupert-class

First Canadian-built submarines, these were copies of the Oberon class but with upgraded engines and sonar. HMCS Prince George sunk by Argentine Navy on April 8, 1982, triggering Canada's entry into the Falklands War; HMCS Petrolia took part in Falklands War.

SSN, Stanley-class

First Canadian-built nuclear-powered vessel and first Canadian nuclear submarine, built by Victoria Machinery Depot in Victoria, BC. This was a slightly larger version of the Prince Rupert class, powered by a CANDU-type reactor designed for use aboard ship, built primarily to gain experience with nuclear submarines. Took part in the Falklands War; on May 23, 1982, sank Argentine destroyer ARA Piedrabuena - the first and thus far only kill credited to the Canadian submarine service, as well as being one of only two nuclear-powered subs (along with HMS Conqueror) to have sunk a ship in anger.

SSN, MacDonald-class

The decision to commission a fleet of nuclear subs was made in 1983, based on the generally positive experience with HMCS Lord Stanley. The decision was made to use a British or French design to save time and avoid having to reinvent the wheel; the decision finally went in favour of the RN's Trafalgar class, and eight were ordered and commissioned between 1987 and 1994, named after early Prime Ministers. The first two were built in the UK, the remaining six were built by Canadian Vickers in Montreal and by Versatile Pacific in Vancouver. The primary difference between the MacDonald-class boats from the original RN design is the design of the reactor - the Canadian boats are powered by a CANDU-type reactor.

SSN, Secord-class

In 1995, the RCN unveiled its "Navy 2020" plan, which called for the replacement of the MacDonald-class of nuclear submarines, with nine to be in service by 2020. It was decided to purchase a licence to build vessels of the French Barracuda design, and the first two, to be called HMCS Laura Secord and HMCS Major-General Sir Isaac Brock, were laid down in 2004. They were launched in late 2010 and are undergoing sea trials. They are to be commissioned into the RCN in 2012, to be followed by one new boat each year from 2014 until 2020. As with the MacDonald-class boats, the original design was modified in terms of the powerplant, the Secord-class boats receiving a CANDU-type reactor. HMCS Laura Secord and HMCS Sir Isaac Brock were commissioned into the RCN on Dominion Day, July 1, 2012 at Halifax. Brock is to set out on a round-the-world goodwill tour at the end of July, 2012; scheduled port visits include Washington D.C., USA; Stanley, Falkland Islands; Auckland, New Zealand; Sydney, Australia; Cape Town, South Africa and London.

in 2007, Versatile Pacific and Ballard Power Systems, both of BC, purchased a retired Russian Tango-class diesel submarine. While receiving an overhaul at Versatile Pacific's yard, it was fitted with a hydrogen fuel-cell power plant designed specifically by Ballard, in cooperation with Versatile Pacific, for use aboard a submarine. Since 2010 the submarine has been undergoing extensive testing with generally positive results; in mid-2011 Versatile Pacific offered the boat to the RCN for trials, suggesting that the last four or five boats planned of the Secord-class could be built with clean fuel cells instead of nuclear reactors if the tests are successful. So far, however, the RCN has shown no interest in the proposal.


Aircraft Carriers

Year 1946 1948 1957 1971 2014 2015 2016 2020
Number 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3

CVL, RN Colossus-class

18,300 tons full load. Operationally carried a total of 37 aircraft.

CVL, RN Majestic-class

19,550 tons full load. Replaced HMCS Warrior; operationally carried a total of 37 aircraft.

CVL, modified Majestic-class

20,000 tons full load. Operationally carried 18 fixed-wing aircraft and four helicopters.

CV, Queen Charlotte-class

In 1966, the keels were were laid for two aircraft carriers of 48,900 tons displacement as a scaled-down version of the American Forrestal class. HMCS Queen Charlotte was launched in May 1970 and commissioned into the RCN in June 1971, becoming the flagship of the Pacific Fleet. The Majestic-class HMCS Bonaventure was decommissioned in July 1971, while its replacement, the Queen Charlotte-class HMCS Bonaventure, was launched in October 1970 and commissioned in August 1971 as flagship of the Atlantic Fleet. These ships can carry up to 72 aircraft operationally; at present, the standard air wing consists of 70 aircraft - 36 CF-201N Seafire II fighters in two squadrons, 8 CEF-110N Spirit combat jammers, 4 CE-121 Hawkeye AEW and 6 CP-170 Viking ASW aircraft, 4 CC-121A Greyhound transport aircraft, along with 8 CH-148 ASW and 4 CH-148 minesweeping helicopters. Both took part in the Vietnam War, HMCS Bonaventure played an important role in the Falklands War, in NATO operations against Yugoslavia (Operation Allied Force) and in the 2011 operations against Libya, while HMCS Queen Charlotte took part in the first Gulf War and in operations in Afghanistan.

CVN, Magnificent-class

The "Navy 2020" plan called for the replacement of the Queen Charlotte-class carriers with larger carriers starting in 2015, with a third to be added by 2020 to allow for the maintenance of a carrier battle group at sea at all times. In 2001 it was announced that a scaled-up version of the Royal Navy's Queen Elizabeth design would be used, with nuclear propulsion. In 2004, the MIL-Davie facility in Levis, Quebec started an expansion program to accommodate vessels of up to 70,000 tons; the construction was finished in 2008 and the RCN placed the order for the construction of the lead ship, to be called HMCS Magnificent, in 2009. She was laid down in the same year, and is to be launched in 2012 and commissioned in 2015. The order for the second carrier, to be christened HMCS Bonaventure, was placed in 2010, with construction contracted to Chantiers de l'Atlantique in Brest, France, as the MIL-Davie facility has only one drydock capable of handling a ship of this size. The keel was laid in late 2010; the ship is to be launched in 2013, taken to Canada for outfitting and is to be commissioned in 2016. The third ship, to be called HMCS Queen Charlotte, is to begin construction in 2015 after the commissioning of HMCS Magnificent. The air wing is to be comprised of 36 CF-201N Seafire II multirole fighters, 8 CEF-201N Avenger II combat jammers, 3 modernised CE-121 Hawkeye AEW aircraft, 6 CP-170 Viking ASW patrol aircraft, 6 CC-121A Greyhound transports, as well as 12 CH-148 Petrel helicopters (8 ASW, 4 minesweeping).


Destroyers

Year 1945 1946 1948 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1963 1964 1966 1970 1972 1973 1974 1988 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 2005 2010 2020
DDE 7 8 9 9 10 10 12 16 15 16 14 12 11 11 11 8 8 8 7 5 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
DDG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 6 8 9 10 10 10 10 10 10
DDH 0 0 0 1 4 7 7 7 7 7 9 9 9 12 13 12 10 9 8 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 3 10
Total 7 8 9 10 14 17 19 23 22 23 23 21 20 23 24 20 18 18 19 18 17 17 16 15 14 13 13 20

DDE, Tribal-class

Escort destroyers.

DDE, Cr-class

Escort destroyers.

DDH, St. Laurent-class

Helicopter-carrying escort destroyers. HMCS Saguenay took part in the Falklands War, and is preserved as a memorial museum at Trois-Pistoles (Quebec).

DDE, Restigouche-class

Escort destroyers. HMCS Terra Nova took part in the Falklands War, taking minor damage after being hit by a bomb that did not explode.

DDE, Mackenzie-class

Escort destroyers.

DDH, Annapolis-class

Helicopter-carrying anti-submarine destroyers.

DDH, Iroquois-class

Per the "Navy 2020" plan, the three remaining Iroquois-class helicopter-carrying anti-submarine destroyers will be decommissioned by 2014.

DDG, La Hulloise-class

Guided missile destroyers for fleet air defence; with the exception of HMCS Inuvik, named after historic RCN ships.

DDH, Province-class

Helicopter frigates for fleet ASW operations.


Frigates

Year 1945 1946 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1963 1965 1966 1967 1970 1972 1973 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 2005 2010 2020
FF 3 0 3 10 13 12 16 17 18 17 11 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
FFH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 12 14 14 15 17 21 24 26 26 25 22 17 12
FFG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 7 11 14 14 14 12 13 16 11 13 12 12 14 14 14 14
FFL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 14
Total 3 0 2 10 13 12 16 17 18 17 14 11 13 22 26 28 26 28 33 32 37 38 38 39 36 33 40

FF, Prestonian-class

HMCS Lanark - FF 321 (1956-1965)
HMCS Lauzon - FF 322 (1953-1963)

Frigates originally built 1943-1944, then refitted through the 1950s.

FFG, Resolution-class

Guided missile frigates, named after important ships in Canadian history - armed with RIM-8 Talos SAM. HMCS Repulse was severely damaged in the Falklands War; repairs were completed in 1983 and she returned to service later that year. HMCS Warspite and HMCS Discovery also took part in the Falklands War.

FFH, Niobe-class (Batch I Niobe)

Helicopter-carrying frigates, named after historic Canadian ships, including the first two RCN ships. Starting 1973 these ships returned to drydock to be upgraded to Batch II standard. HMCS Nabob took part in the Falklands War.

FFH, La Malbaie-class (Batch II Niobe)

Helicopter-carrying frigates. Niobe-class design upgraded to remedy shortfalls discovered on HMCS Niobe in service. HMCS Wallaceburg was sunk during the Falklands War. HMCS Comox also took part in the Falklands War; after decommissioning it is to become a memorial museum at Comox (B.C.)

FFG, Canso-class

Guided missile frigates; named after RCN ships that took part in D-Day operations. The design of the Canso-class ships incorporated lessons learned in the Falklands campaign.

FFH, Halifax-class

Helicopter frigates.

FFL, Kingsmill-class

Catamaran-hulled fast stealth frigates (officially classified as corvettes).

FFH, Iqaluit-class

Stealthy helicopter-carrying frigates scheduled to replace Halifax-class ships starting in 2021. To be of very advanced design - RCN's stated objective is for the Iqaluit-class ships to be the most advanced frigates in the world at the time of commissioning.

Patrol Vessels

Year 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1963 1964 1965 1970 1972 1973 1979 1980 1981 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1996 1997 1998 2000 2001 2002 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2020
Number 3 15 16 18 14 13 10 9 8 10 12 13 17 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 16 19 23 22 21 20 19 18 16 14 13 12 ~12

MM/PCI, Bay-class

Equipped with minesweeping gear and a single 40 mm gun, the Bay class ships were used on both coasts. Minesweeping equipment was removed in 1973-74 and the boats were relegated to training duties until paid off. Replaced in the patrol role in 1972-73 by the Revenge-class hydrofoils. Four sold to Turkey in 1957, last struck 1994.

PCI, Bird-class

Inshore patrol and fishery protection boats; initial order was for 8, second four cancelled due to long delay in delivery of first four and their poor seakeeping qualities. Very quickly assigned to Navy Reserve; after 1960 were frequently used to give Sea Cadets experience aboard a large ship.

FHE, Bras d'Or-class

Used as a test platform, led to development of Revenge-class hydrofoil. Still holds the sea-speed record for non-racing ships.

PHM, Revenge-class

Fast-attack hydrofoils fitted with a 76 mm gun forward and four SS.12M surface-to-surface missiles based on the Bras d'Or design. Named after the Royal Navy's Revenge-class battleships of the Second World War.

PHM, Valiant-class

Improved version of the Renown-class hydrofoils - the design remained unchanged, but the SS.12 missiles were replaced with four MM38 Exocet, and improved radar was fitted. Names were taken from traditional/historic Royal Navy ship-names.

MM, Kingston-class

Mechanical minesweepers crewed by Navy Reserve, used for coastal surveillance and training. Upgraded in 2011-2012 to keep them in service until around 2020.

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